Welcome to the AAS

Founded in 1923 and now with over 600 members, the Auckland Astronomical Society is one of New Zealand's largest

We are based at the Auckland Observatory and provide for all levels of interest and expertise in astronomy. We are committed to educating our members in the science of astronomy and to keeping them up-to-date with current astronomical developments and discoveries.

The Society members provide voluntary support for the Stardome Observatory public programs.




2019 NZ Astrophotography Competition

Calling all Astrophotographers, it's that time of year again, time to get your entries in for the 2019 New Zealand Astrophotography competition, this year we are super lucky to have the "Bad Astronomer" Phil Plait revise his role as judge for the competition, Phil is an is an American astronomer, skeptic, writer and popular science blogger. Phil is best known for debunking misconceptions in Astronomy but is also a well known Astrophotography enthusiast, he received his PHD in Astronomy at the University of Virginia in 1994, during the 1990s, Plait worked with the COBE satellite and later was part of the Hubble Space Telescope team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, working largely on the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. In 1995, he published observations of a ring of circumstellar material around a supernova (SN 1987A), which led to further study of explosion mechanisms in core-collapse supernovae.

As in previous years we are lucky to have Australian Sky & Telescope on board as sponsors of both the Deep Sky category and the Nightscape / Artistic category, the winners of these categories will receive a one year subscription to the magazine as well as having their images printed in the magazine.

We are also lucky to have Astronz sponsor the Solar System category with a $300 Astronz gift voucher, Astronz is easily New Zealand's best known and most trusted supplier of Astronomical equipment.

The Auckland Astronomical Society will also provide a cash prize for each category winner.

We are also lucky to have Stardome Observatory and Planetarium print a selection of the entrants images for an astrophotography exhibition that will be displayed at Stardome after the competition awards are announced, the exhibition will then tour around New Zealand at various events and galleries.

The competition cutoff date is the 30th of September and the competition awards will be announced at the annual Burbidge dinner which is the Auckland Astronomical Society's premier annual event, keep an eye out on the society website for details on the forthcoming Burbidge dinner.

Looking forward to seeing all your images and wishing you all clear skies.

Competition Rules
https://www.astronomy.org.nz/Documents/Journal/2019%20nz%20astrophoto%20comp%20conditions%20of%20entry.doc.pdf

Entry Form
https://www.astronomy.org.nz/Documents/Journal/2019%20%20hw%20astrophoto%20competition%20entry%20form.doc.pdf

Upcoming Events

Astrophotography Group - Oct Home observatories for astrophotography
Monday 21 Oct, 2019 at 19:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory
Speaker/Host: Shaun Fletcher

Where a viable location exists, a simple home observatory can be a quick and surprisingly inexpensive project, and greatly improve both results and ability to image quickly when the sky allows.
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Astrophotography Group - Oct Home observatories for astrophotography
Monday 21 Oct, 2019 at 19:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory

Where a viable location exists, a simple home observatory can be a quick and surprisingly inexpensive project, and greatly improve both results and ability to image quickly when the sky allows.

Several members who have built or are building home observatories for astro-photography will give presentations on their projects, and answer questions.

There will be a particular focus on achieving a good telescope and computer setup for deep sky and planetary photography.


Practical Astronomy - Oct
Monday 21 Oct, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory
Speaker/Host: Carolle Varughese

This month, we will be heading outside with telescopes to practice our observing skills and how to manually find objects in the Spring night sky. It will also be a ...more

Practical Astronomy - Oct
Monday 21 Oct, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory

This month, we will be heading outside with telescopes to practice our observing skills and how to manually find objects in the Spring night sky. It will also be a good time to practice our skills of celestial navigation, especially with the use of the pipehenge. 

Bring your telescopes if you have them and plenty of warm clothing! 


Film Night - October: Light Pollution - The Disappearing Darkness
Monday 28 Oct, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory
Speaker/Host: Gavin Logan

This months film is a documentary entitled "Light Pollution - The Disappearing Darkness" which tells about how growing light pollution around the world is affecting astronomy and our views o ...more

Film Night - October: Light Pollution - The Disappearing Darkness
Monday 28 Oct, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory

This months film is a documentary entitled "Light Pollution - The Disappearing Darkness" which tells about how growing light pollution around the world is affecting astronomy and our views of the night sky. It also covers some of the solutions for this problem.

Introduction to Astronomy - Space Telescopes Part I - How they revolutionise astronomy!
Monday 04 Nov, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory
Speaker/Host: Chris Benton

Introduction to Astronomy - November

Come along and have fun learning about how space telescopes ...more


Introduction to Astronomy - Space Telescopes Part I - How they revolutionise astronomy!
Monday 04 Nov, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory

Introduction to Astronomy - November

Come along and have fun learning about how space telescopes revolutionise astronomy!

This months discussion builds on our talk in October about large ground-based telescopes are ideally located in remote and elevated locations to minimise light pollution, atmospheric distortion and to get above most of the water vapour which absorbs infrared wavelengths.

Firstly, we will review the atmospheric absorption of most light wavelengths before introducing the astronomers ultimate solution. Space Telescopes Part I will introduce you to six famous space telescopes before focusing, no pun intended, on the Galex, Hubble andSpitzer Space Telescopes which view the universe in ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths respectively.

From there, we will discuss how images from these telescopes are combined and colourised to give insight into astronomical processes and provide the pretty pictures we see on the internet.A case study of these techniques used on the Matariki open star cluster is included, followed by how the field of astrometry also uses space satellites.

Space Telescopes Part II in November, after recapping the main points from Part I,  will focus on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope,Chandra X-Ray Observatory and James Webb Space Telescope followed by a discussion of the Cosmic Microwave Background satellites.

Both parts stand on their own,but we encourage you to come along and enjoy both.




Monthly Meeting - Nov
Monday 11 Nov, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory
Speaker/Host: TBA

TBA
...more

Monthly Meeting - Nov
Monday 11 Nov, 2019 at 20:00Hrs
Venue: Stardome Observatory

TBA


View Our Other Upcoming Events
Astronz M-TRI
Astronz Professional Tripod
Astronz P-DOB08
Explore the sky telescope package
Astronz B-1050P
10x50mm Premium Binoculars
Astronz T-DOB08
Astronz 8" Premium Dobsonian Telescope
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